Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award Recipients by Industry Sector

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Index of Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award winners by industry sector.

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DISCLAIMER: The short descriptions provided in this section were derived by EPA from the winning entries received for the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards and other public information. They are not officially endorsed by EPA, nor does EPA endorse any of the products mentioned in them. Claims made in these descriptions have not been verified by EPA. Each description represents only one aspect of the information in an entry and, as such, is intended merely to point users of this Web site to a summary of the winning entry.

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Agriculture and Agrochemicals, such as fertilizers, plant growth stimulators: 5 technologies
Also see Food and Renewable Resources
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2004 Jeneil Biosurfactant Company Rhamnolipid biosurfactant: a biobased, biodegradable surfactant to increase penetration and dispersion of agricultural chemicals in soil and foliage; also an active biofungicide (summary)
2001 Bayer Corporation; Bayer AG (technology acquired by LANXESS) BaypureTM CX iminodisuccinate: a biodegradable chelating agent that prevents, corrects, and minimizes mineral deficiencies in crops (summary)
2001 EDEN Bioscience Corporation Messenger® proteins: nontoxic, naturally occurring harpin proteins produced by fermentation, stimulate plant growth and defenses against disease and pests (summary)
1996 Donlar Corporation (now NanoChem Solutions, Inc.) Biodegradable thermal polyaspartic acid (TPA) replaces nonbiodegradable polyacrylates, increasing a plant's ability to take up nutrients and improving crop yields (summary)
1996 Professor Mark Holtzapple, Texas A&M University Lime-treated agricultural residues such as straw, stover, and bagasse are useful as feeds for ruminant animals (summary)

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Agriculture and Agrochemicals > Pesticides: 13 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2010 Clarke Encapsulating spinosad, a 1999 award winner and reduced risk pesticide that is unstable in water, within a plaster matrix creates a time-release pesticide for aqueous environments (summary)
2008 Dow AgroSciences LLC Spinetoram, a new environmentally favorable insecticide, registered by EPA as a reduced-risk pesticide for use on many crops including pome fruit, stone fruit, and tree nuts (summary)
2004 Jeneil Biosurfactant Company Rhamnolipid biosurfactant, approved by EPA as a biofungicide in April 2004; made by soil bacteria (summary)
2003 AgraQuest, Inc. (now Bayer CropScience) Serenade®, a EPA-registered biofungicide, made by a naturally occurring bacterium (summary)
2002 Chemical Specialities, Inc. (now Viance) ACQ Preserve®, an arsenic- and chromium-free wood preservative, registered by EPA as a pesticide for use in pressure treatment of wood products (summary)
2001 EDEN Bioscience Corporation Messenger® proteins, nontoxic, naturally occurring harpin proteins, a U.S EPA-registered biochemical pesticide for disease management and yield enhancement (summary)
2000 Dow AgroSciences LLC SentriconTM termite colony elimination system (active ingredient: hexaflumuron), registered by EPA as a reduced-risk pesticide (summary)
1999 Dow AgroSciences LLC Spinosad, a natural product for control of chewing insects contained in Tracer NaturalyteTM, SpinTorTM, SuccessTM, PreciseTM, and ConserveTM; registered by EPA as a reduced-risk pesticide (summary)
1998 Dr. Karen M. Draths and Professor John W. Frost, Michigan State University Catechol is a feedstock for some major pesticides; genetically manipulated microbes convert glucose to catechol, replacing the traditional synthesis of catechol from petroleum-derived benzene (summary)
1998 Rohm and Haas Company (now Dow Chemical Company) Diacylhydrazines, a class of insecticides that disrupts molting in target species, contained in ConfirmTM, MACH 2TM, and INTREPIDTM; registered by EPA as reduced-risk pesticides (summary)
1997 Albright & Wilson Americas (now Rhodia) Tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulfate (THPS) biocides, a class of antimicrobial chemicals with low overall toxicity and rapid breakdown in the environment; registered by EPA as pesticides (summary)
1996 Monsanto Company Redesigned synthesis of disodium iminodiacetate (DSIDA) eliminates cyanide, formaldehyde, and ammonia; DSIDA is the key intermediate in RoundupTM herbicide, registered by EPA (summary)
1996 Rohm and Haas Company (now Dow Chemical Company) Sea-NineTM marine antifoulant, the first new antifoulant registered by EPA in over a decade, replaces persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic tin-containing antifoulants (summary)

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Automotive and Transportation: 11 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2013 Faraday Technology, Inc. Hard chrome coatings for aircraft parts, such as pneumatic tubes, can be electroplated using trivalent chromium, Cr(III), instead of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI) (summary)
2011 Genomatica Automotive plastics are one of the major uses for 1,4-butanediol, now made by fermentation of readily available sugars rather than from petroleum (summary)
2010 Professor James C. Liao, Easel Biotechnologies, LLC and University of California, Los Angeles Butanol, isobutanol, and other C3-8 alcohols made by genetically engineered microorganisms are good fuels with several advantages over ethanol (summary)
2010 LS9, Inc. Renewable PetroleumTM including UltraCleanTM Diesel fuel and other advanced fuels made from fermentable sugars by genetically engineered microorganisms (summary)
2009 Virent Energy Systems, Inc. Gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel made from sugars, starch, or cellulose by the BioForming® process (summary)
2007 Cargill, Incorporated Biobased BiOHTM polyols used to manufacture polyurethane foam cushions for automobile seats (summary)
2006 Professor Galen J. Suppes, University of Missouri-Columbia Process to convert glycerin, a waste product of biodiesel production, into propylene glycol, a higher-value product that can replace ethylene glycol in automotive antifreeze and lower the cost of biodiesel fuel (summary)
2005 BASF Corporation UV-cured primer for automotive refinishing has no diisocyanates, has very low VOCs, saves energy, and requires less time to apply and cure (summary)
2003 DuPont Sorona® polyester, made from bioderived 1,3-propanediol, adds resilience and other beneficial characteristics to automotive upholstery or coatings (summary)
2001 PPG Industries Corrosion-resistant electrodeposition coatings, used primarily in the automotive industry, contain yttrium instead of lead (summary)
2000 Bayer Corporation; Bayer AG Two-component waterborne polyurethane coatings provide soft, leather-like coatings for hard plastic interior automobile surfaces such as instrument panels (summary)

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Broad Applicability, No Specific Sector: 10 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2013 Professor Richard P. Wool, University of Delaware High-performance materials for transportation, furniture, electronics, packaging, and apparel can be made from modified plant oils and biobased fibers (summary)
2011 Professor Bruce H. Lipshutz, University of California, Santa Barbara Specialized detergents create minute spheres (micelles) in water allowing reactions that would normally not occur in water to proceed smoothly, replacing organic solvents (summary)
2009 Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, Carnegie Mellon University Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) used for industrial production of high-performance, safer polymers in a wide variety of applications (summary)
2008 Professors Robert E. Maleczka, Jr. and Milton R. Smith, III, Michigan State University Iridium catalysts used in a halogen-free synthesis of boronic esters, which are intermediates for many important, complex molecules (summary)
2008 SiGNa Chemistry, Inc. Encapsulated sodium, lithium, and other alkali metals maintain the reactivity of the metals but are safe to handle, increasing their usefulness in a wide variety of synthetic reactions (summary)
2007 Professor Michael J. Krische, University of Texas at Austin A class of chemical reactions makes bonds between carbon atoms using hydrogen and catalysts; make little waste (summary)
2004 Professor Charles A. Eckert and Professor Charles L. Liotta, Georgia Institute of Technology Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2), near critical-water, and CO2-expanded liquids; tunable benign solvents that facilitate reactions with increased selectivity, no waste, and facile separations (summary)
2001 Professor Chao-Jun Li, Tulane University Transition metal catalysts for carbon–carbon bond formation in air and water under ambient conditions that eliminate volatile solvents and generate less waste (summary)
2000 Professor Chi-Huey Wong, The Scripps Research Institute Enzymes and environmentally acceptable solvents replace traditional reactions requiring toxic metals and hazardous solvents; enzymes also enable otherwise impossible or impractical reactions (summary)
1998 Professor Barry M. Trost, Stanford University Atom economy: maximizing the incorporation of atoms from the starting materials into the reaction product, thus minimizing both hazardous and other waste (summary)

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Buildings and Architecture: 8 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2013 The Dow Chemical Company Paint performance and eco-profile are improved using polymer-titanium dioxide (TiO2) composite that more evenly distributes TiO2 particles in the paint (summary)
2011 The Sherwin-Williams Company Water-based, high-gloss alkyd–acrylic paints with low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) perform as well as or better than oil-based alkyd paints or other low-VOC alkyd paints (summary)
2009 The Procter & Gamble Company;
Cook Composites & Polymers Company (Chempol® technology acquired by Arkema Coating Resins)
Chempol® alkyd resins and Sefose® biobased oils used to reformulate alkyd paints and coatings with lower levels of volatile organic compounds (summary)
2007 Professor Kaichang Li, Oregon State University; Columbia Forest Products; Hercules, Incorporated Wood adhesive made from soy flour replaces urea-formaldehyde in manufactured wood products such as plywood, medium-density fiberboard, and particleboard (summary)
2005 Archer Daniels Midland Company Archer RCTM reactive coalescent, used in architectural latex paint, replaces volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (summary)
2003 Shaw Industries, Inc. EcoWorxTM carpet tiles for commercial applications: the nylon yarn and polyolefin backing can be separated after use, providing complete "cradle-to-cradle" recycling (summary)
2002 Chemical Specialties, Inc. (now Viance) ACQ Preserve® wood preservative, an arsenic- and chromium-free alternative for pressure-treated lumber (summary)
2000 Bayer Corporation; Bayer AG High-performance, two-component waterborne polyurethane coatings for floors, kitchen cabinets, and furniture; replace most VOCs and HAPs (hazardous air pollutants) in traditional polyurethanes (summary)

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Bulk and Commodity Chemicals: 21 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2012 Cytec Industries Inc. Producing alumina (the raw material for aluminum) from bauxite using Cytec's MAX HT® Bayer sodalite scale inhibitor saves energy and reduces hazardous waste (summary)
2011 BioAmber, Inc. Succinic acid, widely used in foods, drugs, and pharmaceuticals, produced by successfully scaled-up fermentation with a genetically engineered E. coli biocatalyst (summary)
2011 Genomatica 1,4-Butanediol, a high-volume commodity chemical used to make polymers, now made by bacterial fermentation (summary)
2010 The Dow Chemical Company;
BASF
Propylene oxide, one of the biggest volume chemical intermediates in the world, made by an alternate, catalytic route (summary)
2010 Professor James C. Liao, Easel Biotechnologies, LLC and University of California, Los Angeles Butanol, isobutanol, and other C3-8 alcohols made by genetically engineered microorganisms, including photosynthetic microorganisms, have uses as chemical building blocks and fuels (summary)
2010 LS9, Inc. Alkanes, olefins, fatty alcohols, and fatty esters including Ultra CleanTM Diesel fuel are products of "biorefineries" that use engineered established industrial microorganisms (summary)
2009 Virent Energy Systems, Inc. Gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, and other hydrocarbon chemicals made from sugars, starch, or cellulose by the BioForming® process (summary)
2007 Cargill, Incorporated BiOHTM polyols made from renewable, biological sources replace petroleum-based polyols in flexible polyurethane foams (summary)
2007 Headwaters Technology Innovation Hydrogen peroxide made directly from hydrogen and oxygen, by a selective nanocatalyst and without hazardous chemicals, can replace chlorine-containing bleaches and oxidants (summary)
2006 Professor Galen J. Suppes, University of Missouri-Columbia Process to convert glycerin, a waste product of biodiesel production, into propylene glycol, which can replace more toxic ethylene glycol in many uses (summary)
2005 Archer Daniels Midland Company; Novozymes Fats and oils for human consumption that contain no or little trans fatty acids are produced by enzymatic interesterification (summary)
2005 Metabolix, Inc. Polyhydroxyalkanoates, plastics made inside genetically engineered microbes, provide a biobased alternative to petrochemical-based plastics (summary)
2004 Jeneil Biosurfactant Company Rhamnolipids, biobased surfactants that are excreted by a soil bacterium, are cost-effective to produce on a large scale; they are also less toxic and more biodegradable than traditional, petroleum-based surfactants (summary)
2003 DuPont 1,3-propanediol (one of two monomers in Sorona® polyester) synthesized by a genetically engineered organism in an environmentally friendly manner costs less than 1,3-propanediol made from petroleum (summary)
2003 Süd-Chemie Inc. (now a Clariant Group Company) Solid oxide catalysts made in a wastewater-free process produce clean fuels from natural gas, generate hydrogen from carbon monoxide and water, and carry out other high-volume catalytic reactions (summary)
2002 Cargill Dow LLC (now NatureWorks LLC) Solvent-free production of NatureWorksTM polylactic acid (PLA), a biobased plastic, overcomes previous economic hurdles to high-volume production (summary)
1999 Biofine, Inc. (now DPS BioMetics) Levulinic acid, a building block for more than a dozen commodity chemicals, is synthesized by high-temperature, dilute-acid hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass (summary)
1998 Argonne National Laboratory Membrane-mediated synthesis of ethyl lactate from carbohydrate feedstock allows high-volume production (summary)
1998 Dr. Karen M. Draths and Professor John W. Frost, Mighigan State University Adipic acid and catechol are synthesized from glucose by genetically engineered microbes; these two chemicals of major industrial importance are traditionally made from petroleum (summary)
1998 Flexsys America L.P. 4-Aminodiphenylamine, a key intermediate for a rubber preservative, is synthesized without using chlorine (summary)
1996 Professor Mark Holtzapple, Texas A&M University Conversion of waste biomass (including manure agricultural residues) into ruminant animal feeds, chemicals, and fuel (summary)

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Electronics and Semiconductors: 3 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2002 SC Fluids, Inc. Supercritical CO2 removes photoresist from semiconductor wafers, replacing hazardous solvents and corrosive chemicals (summary)
1998 Argonne National Laboratory Ethyl lactate potentially replaces hazardous petroleum-derived solvents in electronics manufacturing and many other applications due to its favorable economics (summary)
1997 Legacy Systems, Inc. ColdstripTM, an environmentally friendly, wet cleaning technology for the semiconductor, flat panel display, and micromachining industries, replaces highly corrosive Piranha solutions (summary)

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Energy Production, Transmission, and Storage: 1 technology
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2013 Cargill, Inc. Dielectric coolant made from vegetable oil replaces mineral oil, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), or other halogenated compounds in electric transformers (summary)

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Fire Safety: 1 technology
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2013 Cargill, Inc. Low-flammability, soy-based dielectric fluid replaces mineral oil in electric transformers (summary)

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Food: 3 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2011 BioAmber, Inc. Succinic acid, widely used either directly or as a building block in foods, produced by successfully scaled-up fermentation with a genetically engineered E. coli biocatalyst (summary)
2009 CEM Corporation Fast, accurate analysis for protein content of food ingredients distinguishes between protein and adulterants such as melamine (summary)
2005 Archer Daniels Midland Company; Novozymes Healthier fats and oils for use in food products produced by enzymatic transesterification, reducing or eliminating trans fat from these products (summary)

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Formulation Ingredients: 7 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2012 Elevance Renewable Resources, Inc. Difunctional specialty chemicals with many uses in formulated products combine the benefits of biobased chemicals and petrochemicals (summary)
2011 BioAmber, Inc. Succinic acid, widely used either directly or as a building block in foods, drugs, and pharmaceuticals, produced by successfully scaled-up fermentation with a genetically engineered E. coli biocatalyst (summary)
2009 Eastman Chemical Company A variety of esters for use in cosmetics and personal care products made in a solvent-free enzymatic process (summary)
2005 Archer Daniels Midland Company Archer RCTM reactive coalescent, used in architectural latex paint, replaces volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (summary)
2004 Jeneil Biosurfactant Company Rhamnolipids, biobased surfactants that are excreted by a soil bacterium, are cost-effective to produce on a large scale; they are also less toxic and more biodegradable than traditional, petroleum-based surfactants (summary)
2001 Bayer Corporation; Bayer AG (technology acquired by LANXESS) BaypureTM CX iminodisuccinate, a biodegradable, nontoxic chelating agent used in household and industrial cleaning formulations (summary)
1998 Argonne National Laboratory Ethyl lactate, a low-cost, biodegradable, less toxic solvent, potentially replaces hazardous petroleum-derived solvents in paints and coatings, printing, and other applications (summary)

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Formulated Products: 3 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2010 Clarke Formulating spinosad, a 1999 award winner and reduced risk pesticide that is unstable in water, within a plaster matrix creates a time-release pesticide for aqueous environments (summary)
2009 The Procter & Gamble Company;
Cook Composites & Polymers Company (Chempol® technology acquired by Arkema Coating Resins)
Alkyd paints and coatings reformulated with lower levels of volatile organic compounds (summary)
2006 S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc. GreenlistTM process, a system that rates the environmental footprint of the ingredients within 17 functional categories, to reformulate consumer products (summary)

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Fuels, including biofuels: 6 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2010 LS9, Inc. Renewable PetroleumTM including UltraCleanTM Diesel fuel and other advanced fuels made from fermentable sugars by genetically engineered microorganisms (summary)
2010 Professor James C. Liao, Easel Biotechnologies, LLC and University of California, Los Angeles Butanol, isobutanol, and other C3-8 alcohols made by genetically engineered microorganisms are good fuels with several advantages over ethanol (summary)
2009 Virent Energy Systems, Inc. Gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel made from sugars, starch, or cellulose by the BioForming® process (summary)
2008 SiGNa Chemistry, Inc. Encapsulated sodium, lithium, and other alkali metals can safely produce hydrogen for fuel cells and may also be useful in removing sulfur from fuels (summary)
2006 Professor Galen J. Suppes, University of Missouri-Columbia A waste product of biodiesel fuel production, glycerin, converted inexpensively into propylene glycol, which can replace ethylene glycol in automotive antifreeze (summary)
2003 Süd-Chemie Inc. (now a Clariant Group Company) Clean fuels produced from natural gas and hydrogen generated from carbon monoxide using solid oxide catalysts synthesized in a wastewater-free process (summary)
1996 Professor Mark Holtzapple, Texas A&M University Oxygenated fuels (e.g., alcohols) made from waste biomass, including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, manure, and agricultural residues (summary)

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Medical Devices: 2 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2007 NovaSterilis Inc. Terminal sterilization of allograft tissue, medical devices, and biopolymers using supercritical CO2 and peroxyacetic acid to replace hazardous ethylene oxide and gamma radiation (summary)
1997 Imation (technology acquired by Eastman Kodak Company) Medical imaging using DryViewTM photothermographic technology to replace silver halide photographic films and other hazardous photographic chemicals (summary)

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Metals > Metal Plating: 1 technology
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2013 Faraday Technology, Inc. Hard chrome electroplating can use trivalent chromium, Cr(III), instead of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), when employing a reverse pulse waveform (summary)

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Paints and Coatings: 13 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2013 The Dow Chemical Company Paint performance and eco-profile are improved using polymer-titanium dioxide (TiO2) composite that more evenly distributes TiO2 particles in the paint (summary)
2011 The Sherwin-Williams Company Water-based, high-performance alkyd–acrylic paints contain very low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (summary)
2009 The Procter & Gamble Company;
Cook Composites & Polymers Company (Chempol® technology acquired by Arkema Coating Resins)
Alkyd paints and coatings with Chempol® alkyd resins and Sefose® biobased oils contain lower levels of volatile organic compounds (summary)
2006 Arkon Consultants; NuPro Technologies, Inc. (now Eastman Kodak) Flexographic printing washout solvent system uses less volatile, less toxic solvents that are reclaimed and recycled (summary)
2005 Archer Daniels Midland Company Archer RCTM reactive coalescent: propylene glycol monoesters of sunflower oil fatty acids replace VOCs in latex paints (summary)
2005 BASF Corporation UV-curable, one-component, low-VOC primer for automotive refinishing that performs better than conventional urethane technologies (summary)
2004 Engelhard Corporation (now BASF Corporation) RightFitTM azo pigments to replace pigments based on lead, chromium(IV), and cadmium in the red, orange, and yellow color range (summary)
2003 Professor Richard A. Gross, Polytechnic University Reactive components of polyurethane coatings: polyol-polyesters made by immobilized yeast lipases (summary)
2001 PPG Industries Cationic electrodeposition coatings made with yttrium, which is far less toxic than the lead it replaces; primarily used in the automotive industry (summary)
2000 Bayer Corporation; Bayer AG Two-component waterborne polyurethane coatings for high performance uses eliminate (or minimize) VOCs and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (summary)
2000 RevTech, Inc. EnvirogluvTM process: solvent- and heavy metal-free, UV-cured inks for decorating glass bottles and ceramicware, such as for beverages and cosmetics (summary)
1998 Argonne National Laboratory Ethyl lactate, a low-cost, biodegradable, less toxic solvent, potentially replaces hazardous petroleum-derived solvents in paints and coatings, printing, and other applications (summary)
1996 Rohm and Haas Company (now Dow Chemical Company) Sea-NineTM marine antifoulant, replaces persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic tin-containing antifoulants for coating ship hulls (summary)

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Pharmaceuticals: 10 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2012 Codexis, Inc. and Professor Yi Tang, University of California, Los Angeles Simvastatin, a leading drug for treating high cholesterol, manufactured from a natural product using an engineered enzyme and a practical, low-cost feedstock (summary)
2010 Merck & Co., Inc.;
Codexis, Inc.
Sitagliptin, the active ingredient in JanuviaTM, a treatment for type 2 diabetes, manufactured using an evolved, highly stereoselective transaminase (summary)
2006 Codexis, Inc. The key chiral building block for atorvastatin calcium (the active ingredient in Lipitor® used to lower cholesterol) synthesized by three biocatalysts greatly improved by directed evolution (summary)
2006 Merck & Co., Inc. Sitagliptin, the active ingredient in JanuviaTM, used to treat type 2 diabetes, made by a novel green synthesis for ß-amino acids (summary)
2005 Merck & Co., Inc. Aprepitant, the active ingredient in Emend®, used to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, made by a convergent, highly atom-economical safer synthesis that also saves water (summary)
2004 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Paclitaxel, the active ingredient in Taxol®, used to treat ovarian and breast cancer, synthesized by plant cell fermentation (summary)
2002 Pfizer, Inc. Sertraline, the active ingredient in Zoloft®, used to treat depression, synthesized by a process that eliminates waste, reduces solvents, and doubles overall product yield (summary)
2000 Roche Colorado Corporation (now CordenPharma Colorado) Ganciclovir, the active ingredient in Cytovene®, a potent antiviral agent, synthesized by the Guanine Triester Process, eliminates two hazardous solid waste streams and 11 chemicals (summary)
1999 Lilly Research Laboratories A drug candidate for the treatment of epilepsy, synthesized by a process including a yeast-mediated asymmetric reaction that eliminates chromium waste and large volumes of solvent (summary)
1997 BHC Company (now BASF Corporation) Ibuprofen, the active ingredient in AdvilTM, MotrinTM, and other over-the-counter pain relievers, synthesized in three catalytic steps with virtually no wasted atoms (summary)

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Pigments, Dyes, and Colorants: 2 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2004 Engelhard Corporation (now BASF Corporation) RightFitTM azo pigments based on calcium, strontium, and barium replace traditional pigments based on lead, chromium(IV), and cadmium in the red, orange, and yellow color range (summary)
2000 RevTech, Inc. Biodegradable organic pigments: central to the UV-curable, heavy-metal-free, very low VOC inks of the EnvirogluvTM glass decorating technology (summary)

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Plastics: 14 technologies
See also: Polymers > Chemical Polymers and Polymers > Biopolymers
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2012 Professor Geoffrey W. Coates, Cornell University Plastics made from carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) using new catalysts include a plastic coating to replace the bisphenol A epoxy coatings lining food and drink cans (summary)
2012 Professor Robert M. Waymouth, Stanford University and Dr. James L. Hedrick, IBM Almaden Research Center Plastics made using metal-free organic catalysts eliminate the hazards of metal catalysts; other plastics depolymerized with other organic catalysts enable cradle-to-cradle recycling (summary)
2011 Kraton Performance Polymers, Inc. NEXARTM is a new family of sulfonated pentablock copolymers manufactured without halogenated solvents that form high-flow membranes used for reverse osmosis water filtration (summary)
2007 Cargill, Incorporated BiOHTM polyols made from renewable, biological sources replace petroleum-based polyols in flexible polyurethane foams (summary)
2006 S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc. Saran Wrap plastic reformulated using GreenlistTM process, a system that rates the environmental footprint of the ingredients within 17 functional categories (summary)
2005 Metabolix, Inc. Bioplastics (polyhydroxyalkanoates) made within genetically engineered organisms replace petroleum-based plastics in a wide variety of uses (summary)
2005 Professor Robin D. Rogers, The University of Alabama Thermoplastics to replace polypropylene and polyethylene are among the advanced materials that can be made using ionic liquids dissolve a number of "difficult" polymers, including cellulose (summary)
2004 Engelhard Corporation (now BASF Corporation) Coloring plastics with RightFitTM pigments: organic azo pigments in the red, orange, and yellow range with brilliant colors, high color strength, and good heat stability (summary)
2003 DuPont Sorona® polyester and other new plastics can be made from 1,3-propanediol, a monomer synthesized by a genetically engineered microorganism instead of by a traditional, expensive chemical synthesis from petroleum (summary)
2003 Professor Richard A. Gross, Polytechnic University Strong, tough plastics (polyesters) made by immobilized yeast lipases, eliminating heavy metal catalysts and toxic solvents; intermediate in properties between poly(ε-caprolactone) and polyethylene (summary)
2003 Shaw Industries, Inc. EcoWorxTM polyolefin thermoplastic backing for carpet tile: free of plasticizers and polyvinyl chloride (PVC); compatible with nylon 6 carpet fiber for separate recycling of backing and nylon (summary)
2002 Cargill Dow LLC (now NatureWorks LLC) Polylactic acid (PLA) plastic for uses such as cups, food containers, candy wrappers, furnishing for home and office; made in a catalyzed, solvent-free process from annually renewable resources (summary)
1998 Dr. Karen M. Draths and Professor John W. Frost, Michigan State University Adipic acid, a key intermediate for nylon 6,6, made by genetically manipulated microbes rather than from petroleum-derived benzene (summary)
1996 The Dow Chemical Company Polystyrene foam sheet made with 100 percent carbon dioxide as the blowing agent, replacing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or flammable hydrocarbons (summary)

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Printing and Imaging: 5 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2008 Battelle Biobased resins for toners used in laser printers and copiers are easily removed from paper making it easier to recycle (summary)
2006 Arkon Consultants; NuPro Technologies, Inc. (now Eastman Kodak) Flexographic printing system eliminates hazardous solvents, reduces both explosion potential and emissions during solvent recycling, increasing worker safety (summary)
2000 RevTech, Inc. EnvirogluvTM process to print top-quality labels directly on glass; EnvirogluvTM inks are UV-cured and do not contain heavy metals (summary)
1998 Argonne National Laboratory Ethyl lactate (a biodegradable, less-toxic solvent) potentially replaces hazardous petroleum-derived solvents in printing and many other applications (summary)
1997 Imation (technology acquired by Eastman Kodak Company) DryViewTM photothermographic technology replaces silver halide photographic films in the panchromatic film market including medical radiology and the printing industry (summary)

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Pulp and Paper: 7 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2012 Buckman International, Inc. Increased paper strength and quality result from using Maximyze® cellulase enzymes to increase "fibrils" binding wood fibers (summary)
2008 Battelle Increased recycling of waste paper is possible because biobased resins that are part of toner for photocopiers and printers are easily removed during the de-inking processes (summary)
2005 Professor Robin D. Rogers, The University of Alabama Cellulose from virtually any source (including fibrous, amorphous, pulp, paper, etc.) can be dissolved and processed in ionic liquids to create advanced, cellulose-based materials (summary)
2004 Buckman Laboratories International, Inc. More efficient processing of recycled papers and the production of higher-quality paper using Optimize® to hydrolyze polyvinyl acetate and other major sticky contaminants of recycled paper (summary)
2000 Bayer Corporation; Bayer AG Paper products: one of many current uses for high-performance, two-component waterborne polyurethanes that eliminate most or all organic solvents used in conventional polyurethanes (summary)
1999 Biofine, Inc. (now DPS BioMetics) Conversion of waste cellulose of low-cost biomass wastes, including paper mill sludge, unrecyclable waste paper, and waste wood, to levulinic acid, a building block for many useful chemical products (summary)
1999 Professor Terry Collins, Carnegie Mellon University TAMLTM catalysts activate hydrogen peroxide to bleach wood pulp or waste water (summary)

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Safety: 1 technology
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
1998 PYROCOOL Technologies, Inc. PyrocoolTM fire extinguishing foam, a highly effective formulation of biodegradable surfactants: less toxic than alternatives, inherently safer to use, far less potential for environmental damage (summary)

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Soaps and Detergents: 7 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2012 Elevance Renewable Resources, Inc. Cold-water detergents are one product formulated with novel difunctional chemicals that combine the attributes of biobased chemicals and petrochemicals (summary)
2011 Professor Bruce H. Lipshutz, University of California, Santa Barbara TPGS-750-M is a "designer" surfactant and a second-generation nanomicelle-forming amphiphile composed of safe, inexpensive ingredients: vitamin E, succinic acid, and a methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (summary)
2004 Jeneil Biosurfactant Company Rhamnolipid biosurfactants, a natural, less-toxic alternative to synthetic surfactants, provide good emulsification, wetting, detergency, and foaming properties (summary)
2002 Professor Eric J. Beckman, University of Pittsburgh Detergents (polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS), poly(ether carbonates), and acetate-functional polyethers) increase the solubility of many compounds in supercritical CO2 (summary)
2001 Bayer Corporation; Bayer AG (technology acquired by LANXESS) BaypureTM CX iminodisuccinate, a biodegradable, nontoxic chelating agent used in detergents and household and industrial cleaners (summary)
1998 Argonne National Laboratory Ethyl lactate, a low-cost, biodegradable, less-toxic solvent, potentially replaces hazardous petroleum-derived solvents in soaps, detergents, and many other applications (summary)
1997 Professor Joseph M. DeSimone, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) and North Carolina State University (NCSU) Surfactants for use in liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) greatly increase the solubility of many other substances in CO2, allowing CO2 use in various cleaning processes (summary)

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Specialty Chemicals: 1 technology
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2013 Life Technologies Corporation Reagents for DNA testing are made with a one-pot, three-step synthesis that is much more efficient, eliminates hazardous solvents, and greatly reduces waste (summary)

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Textiles and Fibers: 7 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2005 Professor Robin D. Rogers, The University of Alabama Cotton fiber (including waste) is one source of cellulose that be dissolved and processed in ionic liquids to create advanced, cellulose-based materials (summary)
2003 DuPont Sorona® polyester made possible by the biocatalytic production of 1,3-propanediol to replace a petroleum-based synthesis; characterized by softness, stretch and recovery, easy care, stain resistance, and colorfastness (summary)
2002 Cargill Dow LLC (now NatureWorks LLC) Fibers made from biobased NatureWorksTM polylactic acid (PLA) can be woven into textile fabric or blended with other fibers, such as cotton, before weaving; marketed as IngeoTM fibers (summary)
2001 Novozymes North America, Inc. Cotton wax from cotton fiber, yarn, and fabric is removed by BioPreparationTM enzyme technology in preparation for dyeing and finishing the cotton; this technology eliminates corrosive chemicals and saves water (summary)
1999 Professor Terry Collins, Carnegie Mellon University Transfer of dyes between fabrics during laundering may be prevented by TAMLTM catalysts and peroxide; TAMLTM catalysts also enhance stain removal and allow washing machines to use less water and energy (summary)
1998 Argonne National Laboratory Textile manufacturing potentially made safer by replacing hazardous petroleum-derived solvents with ethyl lactate, a low-cost, biodegradable, nontoxic solvent; many additional applications, too (summary)
1997 Professor Josephy M. DeSimone, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) and North Carolina State University (NCSU) Garment cleaning in liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) made possible by surfactants that greatly increase the solubility of many other substances in CO2; this cleaning system replaces hazardous solvents (summary)

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Water treatment: 6 technologies
Year Winner Description of the Winning Technology in Relation to the Topic Area
2011 Kraton Performance Polymers, Inc. NEXARTM high-flow membranes for reverse osmosis water filtration for water desalination and other filtration uses (summary)
2008 Nalco Company Fluorescent-tagged molecules in the 3D TRASAR® system detect the formation of mineral scale, microbial growth, and corrosion in cooling water systems, adding appropriate chemicals only when required (summary)
2001 Bayer Corporation; Bayer AG (technology acquired by LANXESS) Industrial water treated in BaypureTM CX iminodisuccinate, a biodegradable, nontoxic chelating agent replacing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (summary)
1999 Nalco Company Wastewater streams treated with polyacrylates dispersed in aqueous ammonium sulfate, eliminating hydrocarbon solvent and surfactants required in traditional emulsion polymerizations (summary)
1997 Albright & Wilson Americas (now Rhodia) Industrial water, including wastewater from offshore oil and gas production, treated with tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulfate (THPS), a biodegradable, less-toxic biocide (summary)
1996 Donlar Corporation (now NanoChem Solutions, Inc.) Industrial water treated with thermal polyaspartic acid (TPA), a biodegradable, nontoxic scale and corrosion inhibitor, replacing nondegradable polyacrylates (summary)

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