Port Stakeholder Summit - April 2014

summit attendees
Major stakeholders with interest in port facility operations and environmental impacts convened for an EPA summit.

 

Advancing More Sustainable Ports

On April, 8, 2014 EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality hosted the Port Stakeholders Summit in Baltimore. The Summit served as a venue for port professionals, experts and stakeholders to address the many opportunities and challenges faced by our nation’s ports and neighboring communities.  Meeting Summary and Summit Agenda

Opening Remarks

Kathy Broadwater, Deputy Executive Director, Maryland Port Administration
Shawn Garvin, Regional Administrator, EPA Region 3

Keynote

Bob Perciasepe, EPA Deputy Administrator

National Conversation on Ports: Insights

Chris Grundler, Director, EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality
Dennis McLerran, Regional Administrator EPA Region 10

Community Engagement:
Historical Perspectives and the Path Forward

Robert Bullard, Dean, Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs, Texas Southern University

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Panels

Strategies for Improving the Environmental Profile of Ports

Moderator: Susan Monteverde, American Association of Port Authorities
Michael S. Derby, Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics

Measuring Port Environmental Performance

Moderator: Elena Craft, Environmental Defense Fund (Moderator)

Incentivizing Environmental Improvements

Moderator: James Jack, Coalition for Responsible Transportation

Port Expansion – Illustrative Case Study

Moderator: Jerry Boese, Ross Strategic, Port of Arbor Case Study (PDF)(27 pp, 325 K, April 8, 2014)

  • Sacoby Wilson, Community Engagement, Environmental Justice, and Health
  • Gerry Coyle, Evans Delivery Company Inc.
  • Erica Holloman, Greater Southeast Development Corporation
  • Amy Goldsmith, New Jersey Environmental Federation
  • John Esposito, Ports America
  • Heather Wood, Virginia Port Authority
  • Peg Hanna, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
  • Frank Esposito, U.S. Coast Guard

Recap Work Groups Actions and Discussion

Allen Schaeffer, Diesel Technology Forum

Poster displays provided by:

Baltimore Port Alliance | Diesel Technology Forum | Donaldson Company, Inc. | Foss Maritime | Hug Filtersystems | Manufacturers of Emission Controls Association | Port of Seattle

Executive Steering Committee

EPA’s Office of Transportation and Air Quality would like to thank all members of the Executive Steering Committee, whose contributions were essential to the success of the Summit. Members represented the following organizations:

American Association of Port Authorities | Coalition for Responsible Transportation | Diesel Technology Forum | Environmental Defense Fund | International Council on Clean Transportation | Low Country Alliance for Model Communities | Manufacturers of Emission Controls Association | Maryland Port Administration | U.S. EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality | U.S. EPA Office of Environmental Justice | U.S. Department of Transportation

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Kathy Broadwater, Deputy Executive Director, Maryland Port Administration

Kathy Broadwater
“The Maryland Port Administration (MPA) is pleased that EPA has chosen Baltimore for the inaugural National Stakeholders Summit. I commend the EPA in initiating this National Conversation on Ports.

"This is an outstanding opportunity to learn about and discuss partnerships involving citizens, the private sector, non-government organizations and government that are used in Ports across the U.S. as well as share the collaborative relationships in the Port of Baltimore that have been critical to our success.”

Shawn Garvin, Regional Administrator, EPA Region 3

Picture of Shawn Garvin
“We’ve learned that those who live and work in communities closest to port facilities are best able to identify solutions that align well with the priorities of the surrounding neighborhoods.

“We welcome the opportunity to continue functioning in a collaborative capacity with the port sector, neighboring communities, and our local, state, and federal partners.”

Bob Perciasepe, EPA Deputy Administrator, Keynote Speaker

Bob Perciasepe
“EPA committed to use our tools and expertise to empower ports, shippers, and communities to work together towards a shared goal of a healthy and prosperous future.

“By focusing on reducing emissions, together we can spur innovation, job creation, clean energy and economic growth for years to come. As we explore promising actions for advancing more sustainable ports, we must keep in mind that both the economy and the environment must provide for current and future generations.

“There’s a unifying threat that ties all of us together, regardless of what part of the port community we hail from. We’re all interested in a strong local economy and protecting public health.”

Chris Grundler, Dennis McLerran, Director, EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality
Regional Administrator EPA Region 10

“Dennis McLerran: Ports are complex and often times with many competing interests needing different strategies. There needs to be better alignment across the board- among stakeholders, between governments, and within ports on environmental programs and objectives. The webinars and summit are the first step in developing a mechanism to convene and share information and input among all stakeholders.
Fireside chat with Chris Grundler and Dennis McLerran

“Chris Grundler: Many public health and climate concerns at ports are related to air emissions. Work has already begun with a number of strategic, programmatic, and technology approaches to improve air quality. EPA will continue working with regions and federal agencies to address other environmental concerns at ports and seek partnerships and collaborations that could expand the conversation beyond air.”

Robert Bullard, Dean, Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs, Texas Southern University

Robert Bullard
“Greening our nation’s ports and making them more sustainable have tremendous health and environmental justice benefits since a disproportionate share of ports are located in low-wealth and people of color communities.

“Priorities must be given to reducing environmental and health burdens on these fenceline communities and targeted initiatives undertaken to increase economic benefits to make them more sustainable, livable and resilient.”