Region 8

California Gulch

California Gulch site location map Site Type: Final NPL
City: Leadville
County: Lake
Street Address: S. of CY-Yak Tunnel Downstream
ZIP Code: 80461
EPA ID: COD980717938
SSID: 0829
Site Aliases: Mestas Well
Congressional District: 5

What's New?

Updated October 2014

On October 24, 2014, EPA and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment deleted Operable Units (OUs) 4, 5 and 7 within the California Gulch Superfund site from the National Priorities List (NPL). The public comment period on the proposed NPL partial deletions concluded on September 11, 2014. After consideration of public comments, EPA has determined that no further action is needed within these operable units.

  • OU4 (Upper California Gulch) encompasses the California Gulch watershed above the portal for the Yak Tunnel.
  • OU5 (ASARCO Smelter/Colorado Zinc-Lead Mill Site) addresses contaminants associated with historic smelter sites around Leadville, and one mill site.
  • OU7 (Apache Tailings) ASARCO consolidated and capped this tailings pile in 2002.

Lake County receives $400K to clean up and redevelop contaminated sites

(Denver, Colo. – May 28, 2014) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced today that Lake County, Colorado will receive a $400K Brownfields assessment grant to assess, clean up and redevelop contaminated properties in targeted redevelopment areas in Leadville and the county.

The EPA Brownfields funds will be used by Lake County to conduct more than a dozen environmental site assessments in downtown Leadville, along the U.S. 24 highway corridor, the Lake County Airport and Business Park, and in a redevelopment area along County Road 36. Grant funds also will be used to inventory brownfields properties throughout the county and to conduct community outreach activities. The assessments will focus on sites with potential contaminants associated with hazardous wastes and petroleum compounds.

Read the complete news release »


Site Description

Leadville smelters in the early 1900s
Smelters in Leadville in the early 1900s.

The site consists of about 18 square miles in Lake County, Colorado, and includes Leadville, the highest incorporated city in the United States. Mining, mineral processing and smelting activities in the area have produced gold, silver, lead and zinc for more than 130 years. Mining in the Leadville area began in 1859 when prospectors working in the channels of the Arkansas River tributaries discovered gold at the mouth of California Gulch. Wastes generated during the mining and ore processing activities contained metals such as arsenic and lead at levels posing a threat to human health and the environment. These wastes remained on the land surface and migrated through the environment by washing into streams and leaching contaminants into surface water and groundwater.

The site was added to the National Priorities List in 1983, and in 1994 was divided into 12 geographically based areas, identified as operable units. Investigation of the site began in the mid-1980s.

Map of Operable Units and Deletion Status

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Site Risk

Most of the cleanup at this site has been completed so current risk of exposure is low. Pregnant women, nursing mothers and young children are still encouraged to have their blood-lead levels checked. Lake County continues to offer free blood-lead testing and can be reached at 719-486-0118.

Media Affected Contaminants Source of Contamination
soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, liquid waste, solid waste, sludge lead, arsenic and other metals; acid mine drainage mining, milling and smelting operations

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Cleanup Progress

Yak Tunnel before treatment plant
Yak Tunnel prior to construction of the Yak Water Treatment Plant.

As of October 2014, EPA has conducted partial deletions for seven of the 12 operable units on the National Priorities List (OUs 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9 and 10). EPA may delete an operable unit when it determines: 1) no further response is required to protect human health or the environment; 2) there is State concurrence; and 3) a plan has been established for operation and maintenance and any institutional controls that will be used at the site. Operation and maintenance and institutional controls will continue as long as wastes remain in place at the California Gulch site.

Yak Tunnel, one of two tunnels that drain the historic mining district, was a primary focus of studies and cleanup activities between 1989 and 1994. Prior to construction of the Yak Water Treatment Plant, the tunnel discharged about 210 tons of metals each year into California Gulch, which drains into the Arkansas River.

Since 1995, EPA and the potentially responsible parties have conducted removal and remedial activities to consolidate, contain and control more than 350,000 yards of contaminated soils, sediments and mine-processing wastes. Cleanups by the potentially responsible parties have involved:

  • Drainage controls to prevent acid mine runoff
  • Consolidation and capping of mine piles
  • Cleanup of residential properties
  • Reuse of slag.

Below is a summary of cleanup progress and status of each operable unit.

OU1: Yak Tunnel

Lead: Resurrection Mining Co.
Status: Ongoing water treatment

The Yak water treatment plant began operating in 1992 and the water quality in the Arkansas River has substantially improved. The water treatment plant is now operated by Resurrection Mining Company under a Consent Decree settlement with EPA and the State.

OU2: Malta Gulch

Lead: EPA
Status: Deleted July 23, 2001

OU2 encompasses the Malta Gulch drainage. After construction was completed, the Malta Gulch Tailing Impoundment and Malta Tailing Impoundment remained. Institutional controls for these impoundments are provided by Lake County, as the properties are zoned for industrial mining. This operable unit was deleted from the National Priorities List in 2001.

OU3: Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Slag Piles, Railroad Easement, Railroad Yard, and the Mineral Belt Trail

Lead: Union Pacific
Status: Operations and maintenance

OU3 encompasses several different slag piles and historic rail yards with high lead levels, including the Harrison Avenue slag pile and a portion of the Mineral Belt Trail. Slag is a by-product of smelting operations and has a high concentration of heavy metals. Union Pacific removed and consolidated the Harrison Street slag pile into the Arkansas Valley slag pile. Based on current land use, EPA determined that slag does not pose elevated health risks. Lake County adopted amendments to the Lake County Land Development Code in February 2009 that provide institutional controls—land use guidelines—for this operable unit. On August 8, 2014, an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) was signed. The ESD requires institutional controls and clarifies future use of fine slag.

OU4: Upper California Gulch

Lead: Resurrection Mining Co.
Status: Deleted October 24, 2014

This operable unit encompasses the California Gulch watershed above the portal for the Yak Tunnel. Resurrection Mining Company has constructed water diversion channels and settling ponds to prevent heavy metals from flowing into surface water. This operable unit will be ready for deletion from the NPL once institutional controls are in place.

OU5: ASARCO Smelter/Colorado Zinc-Lead Mill Site

Lead: EPA
Status: Deleted October 24, 2014

OU5 addresses contaminants associated with historic smelter sites around Leadville, and one mill site. One collection of smelter sites is known as the EGWA sites (Elgin Smelter, Grant/Union Smelter, Western Zinc Smelter, and Arkansas Valley South Hillside Slag Pile,) and the second is known as the AV/CZL sites (Arkansas Valley Smelter and Colorado Zinc-Lead Mill). Smelter waste, waste rock and tailings from the milling process were consolidated and capped with a soil cover on-site. Field work has been completed at this operable unit and institutional controls still need to be implemented. EPA assumed lead responsibility for OU5 following a bankruptcy settlement with ASARCO.

OU6: Stray Horse Gulch

Retention pond in Stray Horse Gulch
Retention pond constructed to collect contaminated surface water in Stray Horse Gulch. Acid rock drainage results when water flows through and over disturbed mine waste rock piles.

Lead: EPA
Status: Remedial design

OU6 includes approximately 3.4 square miles in the northeastern portion of the California Gulch site and includes the Stray Horse Gulch and Evans Gulch watersheds.

OU6 consists primarily of undeveloped land with cultural and historic resources including mining sites. The mine wastes in Stray Horse Gulch are in the form of waste rock piles and mill tailing.

Most of OU6 is currently zoned by Lake County as industrial/mining. Other land uses within OU6 include commercial activities which are limited to recreation and historic mine/heritage tourism and residential home ownership. Recreational activities include biking, Nordic skiing, ATV use and hiking.

A ROD Amendment for OU6 was signed in September 2010. The ROD Amendment changes a portion of the existing remedy addressing environmental contamination in the Stray Horse Gulch area of OU6. EPA and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) determined that the surface water portion of the 2003 ROD was not sufficient or sustainable.

The cleanup remedies for Stray Horse Gulch documented in the 2003 ROD combined two strategies to address contaminated water known as acid rock drainage. The first was to consolidate and cap mine waste rock piles and the second was to manage surface water.

The surface water portion of the 2003 ROD addresses several million gallons of acid rock drainage that is generated from uncapped mine waste rock piles. Acid rock drainage is produced when water contacts the mine waste rock, producing acid which increases the acidity of the water and mobilizes heavy metals. The acid rock drainage is diverted through a series of underground mine workings and the Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnel (LMDT) to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s water treatment plant.

Recent studies conducted by EPA conclude that using the mine workings and the LMDT to convey water cannot be relied on for the long-term. This is due to known blockages and concerns regarding the structural integrity of the LMDT. The OU6 ROD Amendment includes the following components:

Acid Rock Drainage Work Areas in OU6
Work Areas for Addressing Mine Waste Piles in OU6

Click on the maps above to view enlargements of the OU6 work area
(opens in pop-up)
  • Improving the clean water diversions systems along the Mahala, Pyrenees, Greenback, RAM, Old and New Mikado, and Adelaide-Ward waste rock piles.
  • Capping additional mine waste rock piles, as determined in the remedial design, to decrease the volume of acid rock drainage (ARD) generated.
  • Enhancing the current ARD collection system and retention ponds.
  • Eliminating the use of the LMDT and reclamation treatment plant except in case of emergencies.
  • Shifting monitoring of groundwater and water levels in the LMDT to the OU12 site-wide surface and groundwater remedy.
  • Siting and constructing a site-wide repository in OU6.
  • Implementing land use restrictions (Institutional Controls) to protect engineered remedies and to reduce exposure to contaminants that will remain.

Historic Preservation and Mitigation Opportunities

EPA and CDPHE understand that mining history and heritage tourism are important to Lake County. The agencies are working with community members on how best to mitigate impacts from potential work on waste rock piles.

EPA and CDPHE will develop a final cultural resource mitigation plan that will include two documents:

  • Procedures to Reduce Potential Adverse Impacts to Historic Sites in the Proposed Work Area in OU6.
  • Historic Preservation Plan.

EPA and CDPHE are currently taking input on the Draft Procedures to Reduce Potential Adverse Impacts to Historic Sites in the Proposed Work Area in OU6 (PDF) 27 pp, 3.5 MB, about PDF). Click the title to view a copy and find out how to make a comment. The draft Historic Preservation Plan will be available for public input during the design phase of the project.

Generally, EPA seeks to avoid impacting identified cultural resources, but if avoidance is not possible, EPA will mitigate impacts of the proposed remedial action on historic features in the area. The Mitigation and Historic Preservation Plan will be finalized based on public input during the design phase. Activities may include restoring head frames and other structures and providing interpretive signage and other features along the Mineral Belt Trail to support heritage tourism.

Please feel free to share your ideas about historic mitigation measures to be taken at OU6 by submitting comments to Chris Wardell, EPA's community involvement coordinator.

Next Steps

Now that the ROD Amendment is final, EPA is designing the remedy. EPA will accept public input on the remedial design (RD) once it becomes 30 percent complete. Community input has been and continues to be important to the success of this project.

About the Pilot Study on Capping Approaches in Stray Horse Gulch

Based on community interest in preserving the landscape of the mining district, EPA and CDPHE completed a study to identify alternative capping approaches that could potentially be used on the RAM, Mikado, and Greenback mine waste piles.

Specifically, EPA and CDPHE have worked with the community to explore more aesthetically pleasing ways to cover mine waste piles using materials that might help to preserve the appearance of the mining landscape.

Please click to view the Capping Study Brochure (PDF) (4 pp, 273 K, about PDF).

Please click to view a summary of the public input received on the capping study (PDF) (4 pp, 31 K, about PDF).

National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA)

EPA is complying with the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) during the Superfund process for additional work in Stray Horse Gulch. To coordinate the historic preservation and Superfund processes, EPA, the Colorado State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation entered into a Programmatic Agreement in 1994. This agreement is currently being updated.

EPA began coordinating with the State Historic Preservation Office in April 2009 as part of the consultation process for OU6. At SHPO’s recommendation, EPA re-evaluated historic properties in October 2009 that are located in the area where EPA is planning additional work (the Area of Potential Effect).

The re-evaluation was conducted to determine whether changes have occurred since the Cultural Resource Inventory was conducted in 1996. The original inventory describes sites that have been recommended as contributing elements of the Leadville Historic Landscape District or as eligible for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.

If you would like more information about EPA’s work with the State Historic Preservation Office and cultural resources, please view the files in our Cultural (historic) resources folder.

The file collections below are located on our publicly accessible FTP site. Some of the files are VERY large. There are many documents, so we have broken them down into the following categories:

OU7: Apache Tailings

Lead: EPA
Status: Deleted October 24, 2014

ASARCO consolidated and capped this tailings pile in 2002. This operable unit will be ready for deletion from the NPL once institutional controls are in place. EPA assumed lead responsibility for OU7 following a bankruptcy settlement with ASARCO.

OU8: Lower California Gulch

Lead: Resurrection Mining Co.
Status: Deleted January 12, 2010

EPA has deleted Operable Unit 8 from the NPL. The agency determined that all appropriate response actions, other than operation, maintenance and five-year reviews, have been completed. OU8 is located between the Yak Water Treatment Plant and the point where the California Gulch enters the Arkansas River.

Resurrection Mining Company completed work here in 2002 that involved removing tailings and non-residential soils and channel stabilization in the 500-year flood plain. Parcels within the operable unit include impounded tailings, non-residential area soils, waste rock, fluvial tailings and stream sediment within the geographic OU8 boundaries. Lake County adopted amendments to the Lake County Land Development Code in February 2009. These amendments provide institutional controls for this operable unit.

OU9: Populated Residential Areas

Stray Horse Gulch flowing along 5th Street
Stray Horse Gulch flowing along 5th Street prior to cleanup.

Lead: EPA
Status: Deleted September 21, 2011

EPA has deleted Operable Unit 9 from the National Priorities List. OU9 addresses lead contamination in the residential areas of Leadville and Lake County. In 1995, ASARCO launched Kids First, a program aimed to reduce young children's exposure to lead and to provide information about lead to the community. A Record of Decision signed in 1999 outlined a program similar to Kids First called the Lake County Community Health Program (LCCHP). Performance goals for the remedy were met in 2006. In the summer of 2009, EPA completed soil sampling and remediation for those property owners who responded to a final call.

When EPA, Lake County and CDPHE adopted the Lake County Community Health Program Phase 2  in March 2010, OU9 transitioned into the operations and maintenance phase. The new program, LCCHP Phase 2, serves as the institutional control and operations and maintenance plan for OU9. If you have further questions on the LCCHP Phase 2, please view this fact sheet  regarding the program.

OU10: Oregon Gulch

Lead: Resurrection Mining Co.
Status: Deleted April 16, 2001

OU10 encompasses the lower portion of the Oregon Gulch drainage and includes the Oregon Gulch Tailing Impoundment owned by Resurrection Mining Company. Institutional controls on this tailing impoundment are provided by Lake County, as the property is zoned for industrial mining. This operable unit was deleted from the NPL in April of 2001.

OU11: Arkansas River Floodplain

Lead: EPA and the State of Colorado
Status: Field work completed

EPA signed a Record of Decision in 2005 and field work was completed in 2013. EPA will continue to monitor the revegetated sites and provide maintenance as needed until the reclaimed areas are determined to be mature and self-sustaining. Institutional controls still need to be implemented. EPA and the state assumed lead responsibility for OU11 following a bankruptcy settlement with ASARCO and Consent Decree settlement with Resurrection Mining Company.

OU12: Site-Wide Surface and Groundwater Quality

Lead: EPA and the State of Colorado
Status: Remedial design

EPA and the State assumed lead responsibility for OU12 following a bankruptcy settlement with ASARCO and Consent Decree settlement with Resurrection Mining Company.

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Community Involvement

Community involvement plays an important role in the Superfund process. EPA uses a number of different tools and resources to promote effective, on-going, meaningful community involvement. The goals of the Superfund community involvement program are to:

  • Keep communities affected by sites informed throughout the cleanup process
  • Provide opportunities for communities to comment and offer their input about site cleanup plans
  • Facilitate the resolution of community issues tied to a site

EPA has maintained contact with members of the community and implemented various community relations activities throughout the Superfund process. These activities have ranged from one-on-one meetings and open houses to newspaper articles, fact sheet distributions, and meetings with local officials. EPA holds public meetings and public comment periods at every decision point along the Superfund process. For more information about this process, contact Christopher Wardell, EPA's community involvement coordinator.

Two information repositories in Leadville maintain copies of the Administrative Record and other information about the site: Lake County Public Library and Colorado Mountain College, Timberline Campus Library. See the Information Repository locations below for more information.

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Reuse

Bicyclists on Mineral Belt Trail
Mineral Belt Trail.

EPA places a high priority on land reuse as part of its Superfund response program mission. The Agency tries to select cleanup options that encourage and support future use of a site. We use two fundamental methods to facilitate reuse of Superfund sites:

  • Exploring future uses before the cleanup remedy is implemented, an approach that gives the Agency the best chance of designing cleanup remedies to support the likely future use of a site
  • Working with landowners and communities to remove barriers not considered necessary for the protection of human health or the environment at those sites where remedies are already in place

One option for reuse is the siting of clean and renewable energy projects on contaminated (or formerly contaminated) lands. As part of this effort, EPA is evaluating the potential for energy projects on these properties and working with landowners and communities to identify ways to remove barriers to such projects.

EPA has worked with the community on numerous redevelopment projects throughout the year. Most recently a Return to Use Initiative (PDF)(2 pp, 1.9 MB) supported the Lake County Recreation Advisory Board to secure a $10,000 grant to develop conceptual plans for Lake County Community Park. The agency also coordinated with stakeholders to make certain that mining slag at the construction site was graded and capped to ensure protection of human health and the environment.

Other redevelopment efforts have included helping to develop the Mineral Belt Trail and awarding two Lake County redevelopment grants. One grant assisted with historic preservation planning, interpretation of the historic mining district, and developing the Hayden Meadows Reservoir. The second grant aided the redevelopment of properties in Operable Unit 3.

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Land Use Controls and Other Institutional Controls

Land use controls are the most common type of institutional control (IC). ICs are administrative or legal controls that help reduce the likelihood for human exposure to contamination. ICs can also help protect the integrity of the remedy. Examples of ICs are:

  • Zoning ordinances
  • Environmental covenants
  • Deed notices
  • Well-drilling restrictions
  • Building permits
  • Informational advisories

In July 2013 EPA issued an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) to the cleanup remedies for Operable Units (OUs) 1, 2, 4 and 10 of the California Gulch Superfund Site. An ESD is a document that explains modifications made to a site cleanup plan selected in a Record of Decision (ROD). These modifications, while significant, do not alter the overall cleanup approach for any of the OUs. The ESDs issued for each of the OUs either clarified the objectives of institutional controls (ICs) for that OU or included ICs as a component of the remedy for that OU and established the objectives of those ICs.

For OU1, the objectives of the ICs are:

  1. Unless appropriate plans are approved by EPA or the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, prohibit residential uses, including daycares, since contaminated soils remain in OU1. 
  2. Prohibit uses or activities that would disturb or have the potential to disturb current or future remedies.
  3. Prohibit domestic use of groundwater.

For OUs 2, 4 and 10, the objectives of the ICs are:

  1. Reduce or control human exposure to contaminants of concern.
  2. Maintain the integrity of and prevent disturbances of the engineered features or structures of current or future remedies.

These ESDs are available in Site Documents, under Documents by Operable Unit for the pertinent OU.

Lake County adopted amendments to the Lake County Land Development Code in February 2009 providing institutional controls—land use guidelines—for Operable Units 3, 4, 7 and 8. These amendments will provide land use controls for these units.

Changes to the Lake County Community Health Program "Kids First"

CDPHE, EPA and Lake County have modified the Lake County Community Health Program, also known as Kids First. This program was the remedy selected by EPA to address lead in residential soils as part of the California Gulch Superfund Site. The modification is possible because performance standards were met in 2006.

We have developed a work plan that describes the modified program, called the Lake County Community Health Program Phase 2. The program is designed to help families keep their children from having high blood-lead levels. The work plan went into effect in March 2010, when the Lake County Board of County Commissioners approved the resolution. The plan serves as the institutional control at OU9. If you have questions about Phase 2 of the work plan, please contact Christopher Wardell, EPA community involvement coordinator.

Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnel Emergency Response

Collapses in the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's Leadville Mine Drainage Tunnel caused water to back up. Lake County declared a state of emergency over the potential for a sudden release of water from the tunnel blockages into the Arkansas River. In response, EPA drilled a relief well into the tunnel, installed a pump and constructed nearly a mile of pipeline to transport water from the tunnel to the water treatment plant managed by the Bureau of Reclamation. Construction began in February 2008 and water started flowing from the tunnel in June 2008. Revegetation of the pipeline route was completed in September 2008. Final electronic operations equipment was installed in early 2009. The revegetation effectiveness was evaluated and redone, as needed, in the spring and summer of 2009.

If you would like more information regarding the 2008 removal action, click here to see related documents, press releases and progress reports that are now part of our archives.out of date

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Five-Year Reviews

EPA or the lead agency conducts five-year reviews following the start of a Superfund cleanup when contamination is left on the site. These reviews are repeated every five years. We use these reviews to determine:

  • How the remedy is working
  • If the remedy remains protective of human health and the environment

On September 17, 2012, EPA completed the fourth five-year review of the remedial actions implemented at the site. The findings of the review indicated that the remedies are protective in the short term.

Specifically, the findings were:

  • Operable Units (OUs) 1, 2, 4 and 10 required review as to whether the institutional controls (ICs) in place needed to be incorporated into decision documents. Update: To address these concerns, in July 2013 EPA issued an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) to require ICs for OUs 1, 2, 4 and 10. See Land Use Controls and Other Institutional Controls for more information about the institutional controls that have been formalized by these ESDs.
  • ICs for OU5 need to be implemented. Update: Lake County, on December 22, 2010 for OU7 and April 15, 2013 for OU5, and the City of Leadville, on May 7, 2013 for OU7, implemented ICs in the form of local ordinances, resolutions amending the Land Development Codes and adopting regulations that protect both engineered and non-engineered remedies at OU5 and OU7.
  • Additional investigations in OU3 may be needed to determine if further response actions are needed to ensure long-term protectiveness. Update: Due to the fact that residual slag remains onsite, the ESD, signed on August 6, 2014, addresses the need for ICs, and documents the decision to require ICs. In addition, the use of the term “contingency” for fine slag utilization in the 1998 Record of Decision (ROD) is clarified. Fine slag can be used for future commercial purposes by following the requirements set out in the 1998 ROD.
  • Operations and Maintenance (O&M) plans for OUs 5 and 7 need to be updated and implemented. Update: The O&M Plan was completed on March 20, 2014. The State performs annual O&M monitoring, and periodic inspection and maintenance of the soil cover and surface water control features of OU5 and OU7.

The five-year review report is available in Site Documents below.

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Site Documents

You will need Adobe Reader to view some of the files on this page. See EPA's PDF page to learn more.

Site-Wide Documents

Map of Operable Units and Deletion Status, October 28, 2014

Fourth Five-Year Review Report, September 2012(229 pp, 10.4 MB)

Community Involvement Plan, updated March 2011

Documents by Operable Unit

OU1: Yak Tunnel

OU2: Malta Gulch

OU3: D&RGW Railroad Slag Piles, Easement, Yard, and the Mineral Belt Trail

OU6: Stray Horse Gulch

All documents for OU6 are located on this publicly accessible FTP site.

OU7: Apache Tailings

Record of Decision (OU7), June 6, 2000

OU8: Lower California Gulch

NPL Partial Site Deletion Narrative for OU8, January 12, 2010

Record of Decision (OU8) (PDF), September 29, 2000 (109 pp, 1.2 MB)

OU10: Oregon Gulch

OU11: Arkansas River Floodplain

Record of Decision (OU11) (PDF), September 28, 2005 (113 pp, 1.3 MB)

OU12: Site-Wide Surface and Groundwater Quality

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Contacts

EPA

Linda Kiefer
Remedial Project Manager
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8
1595 Wynkoop Street (EPR-SR)
Denver, CO 80202-1129
303-312-6689
800-227-8917 ext. 312-6689 (toll free Region 8 only)
FAX 303-312-7151
kiefer.linda@epa.gov

Chris Wardell

Community Involvement Coordinator
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8
1595 Wynkoop Street (8OC)
Denver, CO 80202-1129
303-312-6062
800-227-8917 ext. 312-6062 (toll free Region 8 only)
wardell.christopher@epa.gov

CDPHE

Alissa Schultz

Environmental Protection Specialist II/Project Manager
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment
4300 Cherry Creek Drive South
Denver, Colorado 80246-1530
303-692-3324
alissa.schultz@state.co.us

Warren Smith
Community Involvement Manager
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment
4300 Cherry Creek Drive South
Denver, CO 80246-1530
303-692-3373
warren.smith@state.co.us

Site Information Repositories:

Lake County Library
1115 Harrison Ave.
Leadville, CO 80461
719-486-0569

EPA Superfund Records Center
1595 Wynkoop Street
Denver, CO 80202-1129
To request copies of administrative record documents call:
303-312-7273
800-227-8917 ext. 312-7273 (toll free Region 8 only)

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Links

Lake County, Colorado Exit

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