Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program

2011 TRI National Analysis: Urban Communities - Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area

Metro Dallas
TRI facilities in Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area

Quick Facts for 2011

Number of TRI Facilities: 348
Total On-site and Off-site Disposal
or Other Releases:
4.5 million lb
Total On-site: 3.2 million lb
• Air: 2.6 million lb
• Water: 4 million lb
• Land: 616 thousand lb
• Underground Injection: none
Total Off-site: 1.3 million lb

View definitions of TRI terms

The Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX metropolitan area is the fourth largest metropolitan statistical area in the United States with a population of 6.5 million. Often called the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, it is composed of 12 counties in north central Texas. In addition to Dallas, Fort Worth, and Arlington, principal cities include Plano, Irving, Carrollton, Denton, McKinney, and Richardson. Developed primarily on prairie, or temperate grasslands, it is one of the larger metropolitan areas, covering 9,286 square miles, about the size of New Hampshire.

The Trinity River is the major waterway through the city, which is also the source of a number of the metropolitan area's drinking water reservoirs. Other significant water features include White Rock Lake, Bachman Lake, Lake Ray Hubbard, Mountain Creek Lake, and North Lake.

The Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington metropolitan area is known as a center for high technology, in part because of its electronics and telecommunications manufacturing. It also hosts large petrochemical, aircraft and aircraft parts, machinery, transportation equipment, and food products manufacturing sectors. In addition, the natural gas drilling and extraction industry is growing rapidly as a large natural gas-containing shale formation underlies much of the Metroplex area.

The primary metals sector (iron and steel mills and smelters) and the stone/clay/glass sector (manufacturers of mineral wool, insulation materials, ceramic tile, and concrete products) had the largest total disposal or other releases in this region. They both accounted for over 18% of the total for 2011. The primary metals sector accounted for 15% of the total on-site disposal or other releases and had the largest on-site land disposal or other releases. In the Dallas-Fort Worth area, primary metals facilities reported 49% of the total on-site land disposal or other releases, mainly lead and its compounds. The stone/clay/glass sector accounted for 23% of total on-site disposal or other releases for 2011, including 28% of total air releases. Almost two-thirds of this sector's air releases were ammonia.

Total on-site disposal or other releases for the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area decreased by 49% from 2003 to 2011, but had a 1% increase from 2010 to 2011. Air releases decreased by 52% from 2003 to 2011, but increased by 4% from 2010 to 2011. The stone/clay/glass sector decreased its air releases by 58% from 2003 to 2011, including a decrease of 9% from 2010. The primary metals sector also had an overall increase of on-site disposal or other releases of 13% from 2003 to 2011, but did report a decrease of 13% from 2010 to 2011.

Top Five Metro Dallas

Top Five Metro Dallas

Top Five Chemicals by Environmental Medium Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area, 2011

Top Five Metro Dallas

Top Five Metro Dallas

Top Five Metro Dallas

Top Five Metro Dallas

These charts represent the top five TRI chemicals in pounds released for this urban community, and they include neither all chemicals of concern nor the priority or importance of those chemicals within the urban community.
Note: This page was published in January of 2013 and uses the TRI National Analysis dataset made public in TRI Explorer in November 2012.